‘Batman Begins’ Actor Karl Shiels Dies at Age 47

Paula Liu
By Paula Liu
July 16, 2019Entertainmentshare
‘Batman Begins’ Actor Karl Shiels Dies at Age 47
Karl Shiels attends the Irish Film and Television Awards in the Burlington Hotel in Dublin, Ireland, on October 30, 2004. (ShowbizIreland/Getty Images)

“Batman Begins” and “Peaky Blinders” actor Karl Shiels has died. He was 47.

His death was confirmed by his agent Lisa Richards in a statement, reported Metro, adding that he was a “remarkable force” as well as a unique individual who acted as a mentor to budding writers and directors.

The late Irish actor reportedly died in his sleep on Sunday, July 14, according to the news outlet.

“Karl was a uniquely talented individual, simultaneously intense, lighthearted, funny, sharp-witted, outspoken and intensely powerful as an actor, director and artistic director of the Theatre Upstairs—where he was such a support and mentor for young writers, actors and directors—and of his own company Semper Fi before that,” his agent said.

“Karl was a remarkable force in the Irish theatre and hugely loved and respected by all who worked with him,” she said.

Richards said that he was a friend to her as well as a loving father to his two daughters. According to Page Six, he wrote that Shiels was “a man loved by so many who knew him and worked with him and he will be deeply mourned by all who did. Our hearts are broken but today our thoughts are with his partner Laura and his family and their mother Dearbhla and his many close friends among whom we count ourselves lucky to have been for so many years. And for the rest of us, as Karl himself would so often say, ‘Onwards.'”

The cause of death has not been revealed, however, sources cited by the Daily Mail said Shiels passed away in his sleep. The actor had reportedly been falling asleep on the set of Irish soap opera “Fair City”. The news outlet also reported that Shiels had been seen on set with crutches, and appeared to be in a lot of pain in the days leading up to his death.

The executive producer of the soap opera Fair City, Brigie De Courcy, paid his tribute to the late Karl Shiels on July 15, saying, “We are absolutely devastated and he will be so greatly missed by the entire cast and crew. Our thoughts are with his family at this incredibly sad time.”

Shiels’s Fair City co-star, Eric Lalor, also honored the late actor in a post on Twitter. “Absolutely stunned and heartbroken to hear of the death of Karl Shiels. A hugely gifted actor and a really great friend, I will miss his so much. Thinking of his gorgeous family, may he Rest In Peace,” Lalor wrote.

Patrick Doyle, an Irish broadcaster, also took to social media to remember and honor Shiels, the Daily Mail reported.

“We worked together in a production of Dracula in 2013 and we shared many laughs. Having watched him perform and respect him for years I spent a lot of time pinching myself,” he wrote. “Last August Karl very kindly agreed to do an interview with me for the radio. He was charming, funny, honest and humble throughout. I am going to miss him. My thoughts are with his family.”

Tom Moran, an actor and comedian, was a friend of Shiels. He expressed his condolences to the late actor on Twitter, writing, “In absolute shock to hear that Karl Sheils has passed away. Karl was a mentor, supporter, critic and a friend and, when you made him laugh, you knew you were really onto something. He had a spirit that shone, onstage and onscreen. Irish theatre will be forever in his debt. #Onwards.”

His death was mourned by many.

According to the Daily Mail, Shiels worked as an electrician before switching his careers and taking lessons at the Gaiety School of Acting in the early 1990s. He hit the big screen after appearing in the film “Batman Begins” in 2005. Shiels also appeared in shows like Foyles War, Doctors, Into the Badlands, and The Tudors.

In addition to starring in television and movies, Shiels was also acted in stage performances, where he played characters for many productions in Dublin’s Abbey Theater, such as Beauty in a Broken Place, At Swim-Two Birds, and The Barbaric Comedies.

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