HK Protesters Sing Christian Hymn, Tidy The Streets As They Appeal for Freedom

By Penny Zhou

Protesters in Hong Kong have touched the world with their peaceful and thoughtful conduct. While millions of people occupied the city’s street, they left without leaving a trace, and that’s not all.

Enduring 150 rounds of tear gas, rubber bullets, and pepper spray from the police could not silence the protesters.

For the past two weeks, the Christian hymn “Sing Hallelujah to the Lord” banners have been hovering over almost every main protest site. The devotional has emerged as the unlikely anthem of the protest.

Some hope the song might help sway the decision of the Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam, who is a Catholic. So far she refuses to totally withdraw the bill that would allow sending Hong Kong people to China for trial.

Protesters sing outside the government headquarters in Hong Kong as they continue to rally against a controversial plan to allow extraditions to mainland China on June 18, 2019. (Photo by Anthony WALLACE / AFP) (Photo credit should read ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP/Getty Images)
Protesters sing outside the government headquarters in Hong Kong as they continue to rally against a controversial plan to allow extraditions to mainland China,  June 18, 2019. (Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images)

Millions of people have taken to the street to protest. But the next morning, many of the footpaths are as clean as if nothing had happened. Protesters stay overnight to clear away the trash.

Anti-extradition protesters help collect trash during the protest on June 16, 2019. (Yu Gang/The Epoch Times)
Anti-extradition protesters help collect trash during the protest on June 16, 2019. (Yu Gang/The Epoch Times)

And many even get creative. After cleaning up the flowers put out to memorialize a Hong Kong student who died during the protest, volunteers used the flowers to decorate the streets.

After cleaning up the flowers put out to memorialize a Hong Kong student who died during the protest, volunteers used the flowers to decorate the streets.(Courtesy to Florence Hui)
After cleaning up the flowers put out to memorialize a Hong Kong student who died during the protest, volunteers used the flowers to decorate the streets. (Courtesy of Florence Hui)

Protesters display manners even at the peak of the rally. Crowds part way to let ambulances and buses through; a scene that some say reminds recalls Moses and his people crossing the Red Sea.

Hong Kong protester part way for buses
Crowds part way to let ambulances and buses through. Some say the scene reminds them of Moses and his people crossing the Red Sea. (Song Bilong/The Epoch Times)
Crowds part way to let ambulances and buses through. Some say the scene reminds them of Moses and his people crossing the red sea. (Song Bilong/The Epoch Times)
Crowds part way to let ambulances and buses through. Some say the scene reminds them of Moses and his people crossing the Red Sea. (Li Yi/The Epoch Times)

The frontline of the anti-extradition protests is full of Hong Kong students; many are just teenagers. They have grown up enjoying freedom of speech, and say if the bill is passed, freedom is gone for good.

Florence Hui, whose photos of volunteers cleaning up flowers went viral, appealed in her post:

“Hong Kong is lucky to have these young people. Adults, Hong Kong government—please don’t ruin their future.”

Activists have pledged to surround the Legislative Council on Friday June 21 if their demands are not met.

Reuters contributed to this report.