Jenna Ellis: State Legislatures Key to Victory

Jenna Ellis, a member of the Trump Campaign’s legal team, says the Constitution is guiding their path to victory against the alleged voter fraud.

In her interview with American Thought Leaders, she said state legislatures have a key role.

“One of the most interesting things that came out of the Texas versus Pennsylvania filing in the Supreme Court is that the Pennsylvania State Legislature, their leadership in both the House and the Senate, filed an amicus brief, admitting to the Supreme Court and telling the Supreme Court that they agree with Texas. That their state’s laws in the administration of the 2020 election were not followed. That gives them the basis through their investigations, their findings, all of the testimony and evidence presented by the mayor and myself at that hearing, for Pennsylvania to reclaim under Article 2, section 1.2 of the U.S. Constitution, they can reclaim their authority to select the slate of delegates. And so they have every opportunity to call themselves back into an electoral section for the purpose of voting on which slate of delegates they are going to send.”

Delegates, or presidential electors, vote for the next president and vice president.

Presidential electors have already cast their votes in each state.

But Republican electors in seven states also cast alternate votes for President Trump, and Ellis says state legislatures still have time to call a special session and choose which slate of electors, if any, they’ll send to Congress.

“I know that Georgia is looking at this very closely, also Michigan with the Antrim County report that came out with all of those, not just irregularities, sheer percentages of discrepancies. And all of the violations of law that occurred in Michigan, as well as Arizona, and also in Wisconsin. So I think that once one state actually calls an electoral session and is willing to run that resolution to vote by simple majority and say, we’re not going to allow corrupted, false certifications to prevail in terms of how we select our delegates, if one state’s willing to do this, I think others will follow.”

Ellis says that at least four of the six states in question have recall petitions.

People can sign those petitions to replace an elected official before their term ends once enough signatures are collected and a recall election is held.