Latest Updates on Tropical Storms Kirk, Leslie
WorldJack Phillips

The U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) says it’s issuing advisories for Tropical Storm Kirk and sub-Tropical Storm Leslie, according to an update on Sept. 23.

Tropical Storm Kirk

Kirk is “moving fast” to the west over the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean, according to the NHC. The storm has 40 mph winds and is moving west at 23 mph.

There are no coastal watches or warnings in effect.

Tropical storm Kirk and Leslie are pictured
Tropical Storm Kirk and sub-Tropical Storm Leslie formed in the Atlantic Ocean. (NHC)

“An even faster westward motion across the tropical Atlantic is expected through Tuesday. Maximum sustained winds are near 40 mph (65 km/h) with higher gusts. Some strengthening is forecast during the next day or two. Weakening is likely during the middle to latter part of the week. Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 70 miles (110 km) from the center,” said the NHC.

“Later in the forecast period, increasing westerly shear should cause weakening … The latter models suggest that Kirk could open up into a trough when it nears the Caribbean,” according to a discussion of Kirk at 11 a.m. Atlantic Time.

Sub-Tropical Storm Leslie

Meanwhile, elsewhere in the Atlantic, sub-Tropical Storm Leslie formed in the North Atlantic Ocean and is “forecast to be a short-lived cyclone,” said the NHC. The storm has 40 mph winds and is moving west at mph.

There are no coastal watches or warnings associated with Leslie.

“Maximum sustained winds are near 40 mph (65 km/h) with higher gusts. Some slight strengthening is possible, but Leslie is forecast to become absorbed by a larger non-tropical low by the middle of the week,” according to the NHC. “Winds of 40 mph extend outward up to 230 miles (370 km) from the center.”

According to the discussion: “Leslie is embedded within very light steering currents, and most likely the cyclone will be meandering today and tomorrow. After that time, with the development of the new low to the north, Leslie will likely move east until it becomes absorbed.”

Tropical Depression Eleven and More

The NHC said that it will not be issuing any more advisories on Tropical Depression Eleven, as it degenerated into a “trough of low pressure.”

“Maximum sustained winds are near 25 mph (35 km/h) with higher gusts. Additional weakening is expected over the next day or so,” said the agency, adding that there are no warnings or watches associated with the storm.

The NHC also noted there is a disturbance located between the United States and Bermuda, and it is forecast to move to the west.

The NHC added that it is slated to hit the southeastern coast of the U.S. by Sept. 25 or Sept. 26.

Florence Leaves 44 Dead

More than a week after Hurricane Florence made landfall in the Carolinas, at least 44 people have died.

“The Cape Fear River will crest again this weekend, along with the Lumber River,” the North Carolina Department of Transportation wrote in a tweet on Sept. 31, adding that the Neuse will also rise on Sept. 24, according to CNN.

“Additionally, new areas are flooding with little warning. Due to this, travel isn’t recommended south of US 64,” it added.

From The Epoch Times