News Anchor Suffers Beginnings of a Stroke on Air

News Anchor Suffers Beginnings of a Stroke on Air
The KJRH TV news station building in Tulsa, Okla., in April 2022. (Google Maps/Screenshot via NTD)

Julie Chin, an Oklahoma news anchor, seemed to suddenly be unable to talk during her live time on air Saturday. She had to cancel the show and was quickly sent to a hospital.

What Chin experienced on air was the beginnings of a stroke, according to her doctors.

She now says she is in good condition.

The news anchor shared her experience in a Facebook post, where she thanks her friends for their concern and writes that she was feeling great before the show. Suddenly during her talking time in the show, she lost vision in one eye, and later her arm stopped responding. Then, “I knew I was in big trouble when my mouth would not speak the words that were right in front of me on the teleprompter. If you were watching Saturday morning, you know how desperately I tried to steer the show forward, but the words just wouldn’t come,” Chin wrote.

Her coworkers realized that immediate help was needed and called 911, according to her post on Facebook. She underwent many different tests in hospital that came back with a good result.

Chin said she realized that acting fast after a stroke is crucial, and that the symptoms of a stroke are not always easily identified. She shared the acronym “BE FAST” which describes the sensations someone has in a stroke.

She also said that in a few days she will be back at work.

Her post received more than a thousand replies, some from colleagues, such as,

“So glad you’re ok, Julie! You’re making national news, and I’m hoping that gives people the tools they need to recognize the signs. Get well soon!” wrote “Dave Davis/News On 6.”

“FOX23 Shae Rozi” wrote, “I’m so glad you’re okay. How very scary!! Thank you for sharing the BE FAST acronym. I’m familiar with the FAST but this is the first I’m reading about balance and eye sight. Continued prayers for complete healing, friend.”

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