O.J. Simpson Joins Twitter and Immediately Makes Bizarre Statements

By Colin Fredericson

O.J. Simpson has announced that he is coming to Twitter in two video tweets, one in which he challenges the opinions people hold of him, saying he will “set the record straight.” In the other tweet he says, “I got a little getting even to do.”

Some Twitter users took issue with O.J.’s choice of words, considering his criminal past.

“OJ Simpson really decided to start a Twitter account on the week of the 25th anniversary of his wife’s murder,” user Real 92.3 wrote in response to the news.

Many other users jokingly expressed fear over the news. Many of the Twitter memes posted in response depict people running away upon finding out O.J. Simpson joined Twitter or interacted with them on Twitter.

O.J.’s first tweet already had over 94,500 likes, over 27,200 retweets, and 22,800 comments. His second tweet had over 78,700 likes, 15,300 retweets, and 11,900 comments.

In his first video, Simpson said what people could expect from his Twitter account.

“ Coming soon to Twitter you’ll get to read all my thoughts and opinions on just about everything.”

He also warned people about fake O.J. Simpson Twitter accounts, and affirmed that this one was real. He appeared to be holding his phone while recording the video.

In the second video it appeared someone else was holding the phone.

“You know, for years people have been able to say whatever they wanted to say about me with no accountability. But now I get to challenge a lot of that B.S. and set the record straight. More importantly I’ll be able to talk about everything, especially sports and fantasy football, and even politics.”

He then wished fathers a happy Father’s Day.

O.J. Simpson was released from a Las Vegas prison on parole in October 2017, after nine years inside for kidnapping and armed robbery, according to CNN.

He is more famous for the nationally televised murder trial he underwent in the 1990s. He was suspected of killing his ex-wife and her friend, but was acquitted of the charges. He was ordered to pay $33.5 million in damages for wrongful death in court actions that followed. Many that witnessed the murder trial did not believe he was innocent.

It was a stain on his career as an NFL star for the Buffalo Bills. In an NFL Films series called “The Top 100: NFL’s Greatest Players,” Simpson comes in at No. 40.

“O.J.’s football legacy is destroyed. People will never remember or think about what a great running back he was because of the last half of his life,” Chuck Klosterman says in part of the series that focuses on Simpson’s NFL career.

“I think people have completely overlooked the fact now that he was clearly the best running back of the 70s,” Klosterman adds. “So if you sort of realize that he’s the best running back at a time when the most important part of the offensive game is running the football, I think you could easily argue that O.J. Simpson is the most valuable player of the 70s for the entire league.”