Pennsylvania’s House of Representatives Will Not Move to Appoint Electors

In a shocking move, Pennsylvania’s House of Representatives announced they would not be taking any steps to appoint their own electors to the Electoral College. This is after Pennsylvania’s legislature heard testimonies of election fraud and even introduced a resolution to contest the state’s election results.

The letter was signed by Pennsylvania Senate President Pro Tempore Jake Corman, House Speaker Bryan Cutler, Senate Majority Leader Kim Ward and House Majority Leader Kerry Benninghoff.

Pennsylvania’s GOP lawmakers said “this should not be misconstrued to suggest we will allow the issues presented with the 2020 General Election to evade complete legislative review and action. We believe that many of the issues presented after the 2020 General Election could have been avoided if not for the actions of Secretary Boockvar and the Pennsylvania Supreme Court.”

Rudy Giuliani responded, saying that Republican legislators in Pennsylvania are covering up for Democrat crimes. He said they have “no explanation for why there are” “700-thousand mail-in ballots in the vote but no record of them being returned.”

He went on to say that he is “ashamed” of the Republican Legislature, that “they completely misled the President and me,” and they have “let down America.”

The struggle between the members of the Republican Party and heads of state can also be seen in Michigan. Michigan GOP is saying a memo from Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson indicates she  “is pushing for the mass deletion of election data.”

The memo from the Michigan Bureau of Elections, which is overseen by Benson’s office, says that “software and associated files must be deleted from all devices” after the certification on Nov. 30.

This comes as another lawsuit is filed in Michigan, alleging election fraud and misconduct in Michigan’s Wayne County. According to local media reports, the plaintiffs are “asking a judge to order an immediate audit of election results.” This is “so potential issues can be identified and acted upon ahead of Dec. 14, when the state’s 16 electors are scheduled to cast their presidential votes.”