Ranking Roger, Frontman for The English Beat and General Public Dies at 56

Ranking Roger, Frontman for The English Beat and General Public Dies at 56
Ranking Roger, frontman for the English Beat and General Public, performs onstage. (Dom Fellowes/Flickr)

Roger Charlery, better known as Ranking Roger, lead singer for The English Beat and General Public died after battling cancer, according to new reports. He was 56.

The Beat confirmed his passing on their website, writing, “We are deeply saddened to confirm that Ranking Roger has died aged 56. We have lost a wonderfully talented artist, charismatic frontman and great friend.”

Last year, he was diagnosed with brain tumors and lung cancer. The Beat announced that he died Tuesday, March 26, surrounded by family.

“He fought & fought & fought, Roger was a fighter,” The Beat wrote on social media. “Sadly Roger past away a few hours ago peacefully at his home surrounded by family. Roger’s family would like to thank everyone for their constant support during this tough time. More to follow in the coming days. RIP ROGER!”

“He fought & fought & fought, Roger was a fighter.” Sadly Roger past away a few hours ago peacefully at his home…

The Beat 发布于 2019年3月26日周二

Formed in 1978, The Beat—known as The English Beat in North America—was a key player in Britain’s “two-tone” ska movement. Ska originated in Jamaica in the 1950s and came before musical styles such as Reggae.

Ska “is a combined musical element of Caribbean Mento and Calypso with a bit of American Jazz and also Rhythm and Blues,” according to JamaicaMusic.com. Ska music is made for dancing and is known for its walking bass line accentuated with rhythms on the upbeat.

The Beat’s early 1980s hits included “Mirror in the Bathroom,” “Save It For Later,” and ”Tears of a Clown.”

Charlery was the band’s toaster, which is the ska’s version of a hype man for hip-hop. He engaged the audiences with his energetic dancing across the stage and his toasts/raps during the songs, which were copied by many, according to Variety.

“I’m devastated to lose Roger, my Special Beat partner!” former ska bandmate Neville Staple, wrote on Instagram. He said he and his wife “have been privately visiting him & his family, at every opportunity over the last 2 of wks, willing him the strength to recover again. Sadly the fight of the lion’s fire has gone out. My whole band and I are so saddened and I will miss Turbo (his nickname for Charlery) so badly.”

Charlery also formed the band General Public and recorded and performed with Sting. In an Instagram post, Sting wrote that Charlery was part of “one of the most influential periods in the history of British pop music” in the mid-seventies as Caribbean music and culture met “alongside young white bands struggling to find an identity in Thatcher’s disunited kingdom.”

He added, “My friend Roger, as a founding member of the English Beat was at the centre of this febrile and explosive clash of cultures, uniquely placed to document the excitement of those times.” He ended with, “Thank you, Roger. You will be missed.”

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The mid seventies was one of the most influential periods in the history of British pop music. The merging of Caribbean rhythms and the tropes of the immigrant West Indian experience alongside young white bands struggling to find an identity in Thatcher’s disunited kingdom produced what would become the second wave of British dominance in popular music across the world. My friend Roger, as a founding member of the English Beat was at the centre of this febrile and explosive clash of cultures, uniquely placed to document the excitement of those times, the heady joy of success, the political turmoil, the inherent racism at all levels of our society as well as the brotherly bond of musicians struggling to make themselves heard within it. Thank you, Roger. You will be missed. Photo by Dave Dunn, 2007, Birmingham.

A post shared by Sting (@theofficialsting) on

Charlery was born Feb. 21, 1963, in Birmingham, England. His parents were part of the so-called Windrush generation in the 1940s, when immigrants from the Caribbean began arriving in Britain, according to NPR.

Charlery managed to finish his biography “I Just Can’t Stop It” with co-writer Daniel Rachel while battling cancer and undergoing various treatments, reported The Beat.

While Roger has been dealing with his health challenges, he has still found time to finish his biography with his…

The Beat 发布于 2019年3月14日周四

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