1 Dead After 2 Small Planes Collide Near Florida Airpark

GREEN COVE SPRINGS, Fla.—Authorities say two small planes collided in air near a Florida airpark, killing one man and injuring another.

Florida Highway Patrol spokesman Dylan Bryan said 77-year-old David Dollarhide had just taken off in a two-seat kit plane near Haller Airpark in Green Cove Springs on the morning of May 29 when he hit a plane piloted by 74-year-old Robert Woolley that was already in the air.

Bryan says Dollarhide’s plane went down near the Clay County Fairgrounds, several miles north of the airpark, while Woolley’s crashed into a wooded area closer to the airpark.

Dollarhide was hospitalized with injuries that were not believed to be life-threatening.

Bryan says both pilots lived near the private airfield, which did not have a control tower.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.

Search On for Survivors After Small Plane Crashes in Ocean

The Coast Guard is searching for any survivors after a small plane crashed into the Atlantic Ocean off New Jersey.

The Federal Aviation Administration says the single-engine Mooney M20J crashed on the morning of May 29 about 1,200 feet from the Cape May Lighthouse.

A pair of Sea Tow boats
A pair of Sea Tow boats joins another vessel off Cape May Point, N.J., in the search for a single engine airplane that crashed into the Atlantic Ocean, on May 29, 2019. (Petty Officer 2nd Class Ryan Keegan/United States Coast Guard via AP)

State police say that the plane is in about 18 feet of water and that a recovery is being attempted.

Plane owner Lisa Campbell of Air-Mods Flight Training Center at the Trenton-Robbinsville airport says it left the airport, more than 100 miles from the crash site, around 8 a.m.

search for engine airplane
Boats of both public and private origin search for a single-engine airplane that crashed into the Atlantic Ocean, off Cape May Point, N.J., on May 29, 2019. (Petty Officer 2nd Class Ryan Keegan/United States Coast Guard via AP)

She says the male pilot’s credentials and the aircraft were “all in order.” She says the pilot was a regular customer who flew recreationally.

Police say it’s unclear whether there were any passengers.

A USCG helicopter
A USCG helicopter joins vessels of both public and private origon off Cape May Point, N.J., in the search for a single engine airplane that crashed into the Atlantic Ocean, on May 29, 2019.(Petty Officer 2nd Class Ryan Keegan/United States Coast Guard via AP)