Look Up! How Our Connections to the Stars and Nature Benefit Our Past, Present, and Future

As humans, we’ve always looked up to the stars, to the planets, and wondered what they are, what they mean, and how they affect us.

Well, wherever you are in the world, you have the opportunity to look up into the sky, and in the night sky, we can look at the stars.

But there are many ways to interpret their meaning, and lots of new technology and old techniques that we can use to see just what impact they have on us, and our lives today.

With modern technology all around us, we often forget about the cycles of nature and the cosmos that our ancestors always relied on. But our health, knowledge, culture, and future are still impacted by our connection to the sun, moon, planets, and beyond.

NTD Photo
In a still image from a video released by NTD, Westport Astronomical Society (WAS) members Dan Wright (R) and president Shannon Calvert tell NTD host Kay Rubacek about the shock and wonder people often experience when they look through a telescope for the first time, at the Westport Observatory in Connecticut, on July 28, 2021. (Oliver Trey/NTD)

 

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In a still image from a video released by NTD, John Lundwall, lead scholar at Fremont Indian State Park Archaeoastronomy Project, leads NTD host Kay Rubacek along a high rock face to view the ancient and unique calendar petroglyphs in the Utah park, on May 17, 2021. (Oliver Trey/NTD)

 

NTD Photo
In a still image from a video released by NTD, scholar John Lundwall discusses his discovery of the solar alignment between numerous petroglyphs carved more than 1,000 years ago that guided the way of life of the native tribes who lived in the region, on May 17, 2021. (Oliver Trey/NTD)

 

NTD Photo
In a still image from a video released by NTD, Shelby Stock, director of Utah State Parks Dark Sky Programming (C), and Kevin Taylor, manager of the Fremont Indian State Park Museum, explain the benefits of going outside to nature and looking at dark skies, on May 17, 2021. Utah has 23 registered dark sky areas—more than any other state in the United States. (Oliver Trey/NTD)

 

NTD Photo
In a still image from a video released by NTD, Rena Pikyavit, a guide for the Fremont Indian State Park Museum (L), and her son Nathanial Pikyavit, a Fremont Indian State Park aide, tells NTD host Kay Rubacek the inspiring story of how they overcame many challenges to find harmony with the changes that have been imposed on their native land, on May 17, 2021. (Oliver Trey/NTD)

 

NTD Photo
In a still image from a video released by NTD, Zane Landers, Westport Astronomical Society (WAS) Outreach instructor, tells NTD host Kay Rubacek about how he brings the inspirational views of the night sky to city streets with telescopes he builds himself, on July 28, 2021. (Oliver Trey/NTD)

 

NTD Photo
In a still image from a video released by NTD, high up on the rocky cliffs of Utah’s Fremont Indian State Park, John Lundwell shows NTD host Kay Rubacek and cameraman Oliver Trey ancient calendarglyphs that were carved into the giant rock face more than 1,000 years ago, on May 17, 2021. (Oliver Trey/NTD)

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