Lori Loughlin’s Daughters Not Allowed to Withdraw From USC During Investigation

Lori Loughlin’s Daughters Not Allowed to Withdraw From USC During Investigation
Actress Lori Loughlin (C), poses with daughters Olivia Jade Giannulli (L), and Isabella Rose Giannulli at the 2019 An Unforgettable Evening in Beverly Hills, Calif., on Feb. 28, 2019. (Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)

Olivia Jade Giannulli, 19, and Isabella “Bella” Giannulli, 20, aren’t allowed to withdraw from the University of Southern California while officials there investigate their admissions following the indictments of parents Lori Loughlin and Mossimo Giannulli.

The issue was clarified by the university, known as USC, in a fact sheet released on April 8 about the school’s investigation into the girls and other students linked to the bribery scheme.

“We are conducting a case-by-case review of any students who may be associated with the alleged admissions scheme,” the school stated.

“USC has placed holds on the accounts of students who may be associated with the alleged admissions scheme; this prevents the students from registering for classes (until they have agreed to participate in the review of their case), withdrawing from the university, or acquiring transcripts while their cases are under review.”

Actress Lori Loughlin, center, poses with her daughters Bella, left, and Olivia Jade
Actress Lori Loughlin (C), poses with her daughters Bella (L), and Olivia Jade at the Teen Choice Awards in Los Angeles. (Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File)

Following the review of each case, the school will “take the proper action,” which may include revoking admission or expulsion.

Previously, conflicting reports emerged about the status of Olivia Jade, a social media influencer who didn’t like attending classes, and Bella, an actress who was a year ahead of her younger sister.

The school has already fired two employees linked to the allegations and placed a faculty member on leave who was named in the federal indictment as a parent.

The internal investigation includes a thorough review of the student-athlete admissions process, officials said in the statement.

lori loughlin with husband walking
Actress Lori Loughlin, right, and husband Mossimo Giannulli depart federal court in Boston after facing charges in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal on April 3, 2019. (Steven Senne/AP Photo)

Loughlin and Giannulli paid $500,000 to have William “Rick” Singer get their daughters designated as recruits for an athletic team despite their lack of experience in athletics, according to emails and phone calls obtained by federal prosecutors.

The scheme worked and both daughters were admitted to the elite university, prosecutors said.

In the case of Olivia Jade, an associate of Singer’s ended up filling out her application because the girl didn’t know how to fill it out properly, Loughlin told Singer in an email published by prosecutors in the indictment.

Singer, who owned a nonprofit and orchestrated the nationwide scheme, created a fake profile presenting Olivia Jade as a crew coxswain for the L.A. Marina Club team, requesting from the family an “action picture” to place in the profile. Twelve days later, Giannulli emailed a picture of Olivia Jade on a rowing machine.

NTD Photo
Olivia Jade Giannulli, 19, in a file photo. (Olivia Jade/Instagram)

She was presented to the USC subcommittee for athletic admissions and was accepted as an athlete-student. “CONGRATULATIONS!!!” Singer wrote in an email to Giannulli and Loughlin. “Please continue to keep hush hush till March.”

Loughlin emailed Singer about a month later to request guidance on how to complete the formal USC application in the wake of Olivia Jade’s acceptance as a recruited athlete.

“[Our younger daughter] has not submitted all her colleges [sic] apps and is confused on how to do so. I want to make sure she gets those in as I don’t want to call any attention to [her] with our little friend [at her high school]. Can you tell us how to proceed?”

Singer then directed an employee to submit the applications on behalf of Olivia Jade.

William "Rick" Singer, front, founder of the Edge College & Career Network
William “Rick” Singer (R), founder of the Edge College & Career Network, departs federal court in Boston after he pleaded guilty to charges in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal on March 12, 2019. (Steven Senne/AP Photo)

Loughlin and Giannulli were charged with conspiracy to commit fraud and honest services mail fraud, a charge that if convicted brings a sentence of up to 20 years in prison.

They were charged with money laundering conspiracy along with 14 other parents on April 9 purportedly because of their refusal to enter a plea deal with authorities.

They now each face up to 40 years in prison and up to six years of supervised release if convicted of both charges.

For the first charge, they face a fine of up to $250,000 or twice the gross gain or loss, whichever is greater. For the second charge, they face a fine of up to $500,000 or twice the value of the property involved in the money laundering. Arraignments haven’t been scheduled as of yet.

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