US

Most Wanted Illegal Aliens List by ICE

By Samuel Allegri

U.S Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) announced the creation of a “VOICE Most Wanted” fugitive list. VOICE stands for Victims of Immigration Crime Engagement and it was established to serve the needs of crime victims and the families affected by people with a nexus to immigration.

The creation of VOICE was called for in Trump’s Jan. 25, 2017 Executive Order, titled Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States.

Added to the VOICE Most Wanted fugitives list were:

  • Saul Chavez, a Mexican national charged in Cook County, Illinois, with vehicular homicide resulting in the death of William Dennis McCann, 66. Despite a detainer lodged by ICE Enforcement and Removal Operations in November 2011 following his arrest, Chavez was released from Cook County custody. Chavez, who entered the country without inspection at an unknown place and unknown time, is wanted by ICE as an illegal alien in addition to being a criminal fugitive.

 

  • Esteban Juarez-Tomas, a Guatemalan national charged in Champaign, Illinois, for reckless homicide, killing LaDonna “Jeannie” Brady, 45, in January 2017. Juarez-Tomas has been previously removed from the U.S. three times. He is an ICE immigration fugitive in addition to being a criminal fugitive.

 

  • Jesus Maltos-Chacon, a Mexican national, charged in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, with homicide and vehicular manslaughter for the death of 20-year-old Blake Zieto. Maltos-Chacon also had previous convictions for DUI and assault. Maltos-Chacon, who entered the country without inspection at an unknown place and unknown time, was ordered removed in October 2006. He is an ICE immigration fugitive in addition to being a criminal fugitive.

 

  • Alan Jacob Mogollon-Anaya, a Mexican national, charged April 2017 for aggravated vehicular homicide, DUI and aggravated assault following the crash that resulted in the death of Shirra Branum, 37, in Washington County, Tennessee. Mogollon-Anaya, who had two prior DUI convictions, entered the country without inspection at an unknown place in 2003. He was ordered removed in October 2017. He is an ICE immigration fugitive in addition to being a criminal fugitive.

 

  • Edwin Mejia, a Honduran national, charged in Omaha, Nebraska with motor vehicular homicide in the death of Sarah Root, 21 in January 2016. Mejia, who entered the country unlawfully as an unaccompanied minor in 2013, was ordered removed in April 2016. He is an ICE immigration fugitive and criminal fugitive.

 

  • Gonzalo Harrell-Gonzalez, a Mexican national, indicted by a Gilmer County, Georgia grand jury on charges of homicide by vehicle in the first degree, two counts of serious injury by vehicle, and reckless driving in the death of Dustin Inman, 16, in January 2001. He is wanted by ICE as an illegal alien in addition to being a criminal fugitive.

 

  • Luis Alberto Rodriguez-Castro, as Honduran national, charged in Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina in October 2011 with negligent homicide and vehicular manslaughter linked to the death of Joseph Storie, 51. Rodriguez-Castro, who entered the country without inspection at an unknown place in 1998, is wanted by ICE as an illegal alien in addition to being a criminal fugitive.

 

Illegal Immigrants Commit 142 Percent More Crime Than Legal Immigrants and Citizens: Report

New data from the Arizona state prison system shows that illegal immigrants are at least 142 percent more likely to be convicted of a crime than other Arizonans, according to a study by John Lott, founder and president of the Crime Prevention Research Center (CPRC).

Lott also found that illegal immigrants tend to commit more serious crimes, serve 10.5 percent longer sentences, are more likely to be classified as dangerous, and are 45 percent more likely to be gang members than U.S. citizens. They are also much more likely to commit sexual offenses against minors, sexual assault, DUI, and armed robbery.

“If illegal immigrants committed crime nationally as they do in Arizona, in 2016 they would have been responsible for over 1,000 more murders, 5,200 rapes, 8,900 robberies, 25,300 aggravated assaults, and 26,900 burglaries,” Lott said in his summary.

The data represents all prisoners who entered the Arizona Department of Corrections for the last 32 years.

Lott said the data used in his report includes detailed information on all prisoners who entered the Arizona state prison from January 1985 through June 2017. The data provided allowed the CPRC to separate non-U.S. citizens into illegal or legal groups, which is the first time such a distinction has been available in data.

By lumping together documented and undocumented immigrants, previous research has missed out on the huge differences between these two groups, the report said.

“As we will see, documented and undocumented immigrants have vastly different incarceration rates in Arizona,” Lott said. “Undocumented immigrants have the highest rates, whereas documented immigrants actually have lower rates than do U.S. citizens.”

The most likely victims of illegal immigrants are other illegal immigrants, which means the numbers are likely an artificially low estimate of the amount of crime committed—because the crimes they commit against each other are far less likely to be reported due to their illegal status.

Lott found one very distinctive anomaly in the data related to recidivism. Almost 25 percent of U.S. citizens who are convicted in Arizona cycle in and out of jail at least five times, according to the data. However, just under 3 percent of illegal aliens have the same prison history.

“The most plausible reading of the evidence suggests that they are leaving Arizona, presumably to return to their home country [through deportation], overwhelmingly Mexico,” Lott said.

Epoch Times reporter Charlotte Cuthbertson contributed to this report.